Graveyard Of Thoughts

Hopeless Romantic. Endless Dreamer.

My name is Kiara, I am 25 years old and I'm Puerto Rican. I love meeting new people and striking friendships all over the world. Don't be afraid to contact me, I encourage you to do so!

September 28, 2014 3:18 am

taco-bell-rey:

People that still tell “women in the kitchen” jokes

image

(via silentpainter)

3:16 am 3:16 am
totallynotagentphilcoulson:

animalaspects:

If it looks like a male lion and is perceived as a male lion—well, sometimes it isn’t. That’s the case of Africa’s unusual maned lionesses, which sport a male’s luxurious locks and may even fool competitors.
Though uncommon, maned lionesses have been regularly sighted in the Momba area of Botswana‘s Okavango Delta (including the individual pictured below), where the lion population may carry a genetic disposition toward the phenomenon, according to Luke Hunter, president of the big-cat conservation group Panthera, which collaborates with National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative. (The Society owns National Geographic News.) (Click pic to continue.)


There’s a couple populations predisposed towards maneless males I wonder what would happen if this population interbred with one of those

totallynotagentphilcoulson:

animalaspects:

If it looks like a male lion and is perceived as a male lion—well, sometimes it isn’t. That’s the case of Africa’s unusual maned lionesses, which sport a male’s luxurious locks and may even fool competitors.

Though uncommon, maned lionesses have been regularly sighted in the Momba area of Botswana‘s Okavango Delta (including the individual pictured below), where the lion population may carry a genetic disposition toward the phenomenon, according to Luke Hunter, president of the big-cat conservation group Panthera, which collaborates with National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative. (The Society owns National Geographic News.) (Click pic to continue.)

There’s a couple populations predisposed towards maneless males I wonder what would happen if this population interbred with one of those

(via silentpainter)

3:14 am

scenicroutes:

"nah we can’t have female leads or characters of colour or gay characters or else our show will bomb"

image

image

(via silentpainter)

3:14 am
thekattcameback:

sharkchunks:

This may be the greatest facial expression ever captured on film.

Pure perfection.

thekattcameback:

sharkchunks:

This may be the greatest facial expression ever captured on film.

Pure perfection.

(via oracle-of-absolute-hoopla)

3:13 am

rosalitacomeouttonight:

toenail-fister:

boneycircus:

fauxcyclops:

morelikekanyebest:

only-ronnie:

i will never not reblog this

Dr. Seuss was a racist. He wouldn’t attach his words to an interracial romance. Here are seven racist cartoons he made about Japanese-Americans during WWII.

He also later apologized and wrote Horton Hears a Who! to illustrate his remorse for his previous way of thinking

#crazily enough people can learn and change

All of tumblr needs to learn the above comment.

i love this quote

(Source: kermitismyrainbowhero, via reguero-mental)

3:12 am 3:11 am 3:11 am
la-utopia:

this feeling

la-utopia:

this feeling

(via silentpainter)

3:10 am

sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death.

Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come.

Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.

“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”

Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here

(via silentpainter)